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Tyrone Wheatley celebrates with fans Dec. 24, 2000

Season Tickets Available
Raiders season tickets can be purchased by calling 510-864-5020 or at Raiders.com. Raiders season tickets are priced at $250 to $1,500.

Please click for O.co Coliseum seating chart and pricing for Raiders home games.

Updated: 01-06-2013

Raiders 32nd In NFL Attendance
The Raiders ranked 32nd in 2012 NFL attendance, according to espn.com. The team averaged 54,216 fans for its eight home games at O.co Coliseum - a decrease of over 5,000 per game game the previous season. The football capacity for the Coliseum is 63,026.

The Dallas Cowboys had the NFL's top home attendance, averaging 88,531 fans at Cowboys Stadium. The New York Giants ranked second (80,495) followed by Washington Redskins (79,654), New York Jets (79,088) and Denver Broncos (76,632).

The bottom five teams in home attendance are Oakland (54,216), Tampa Bay Buccaneers (55,102), St. Louis Rams (56,703), Miami Dolphins (57,379) and San Diego Chargers (59,964).

The Raiders also ranked 32nd in home attendance in the 2009 and 2010 seasons. They were 29th in the 2011 season, averaging 59,242.

Please click for 2012 NFL attendance rankings:

Updated: 02-07-2013

Raiders 29th in NFL Ticket Cost
The average ticket price for a 2012 NFL game increased 2.5 percent to $78.38, according to Team Marketing Report.

The Raiders ranked 26th at $62.23, according to TMR's annual Fan Cost Index survey.

The New York Jets lowered some ticket prices in 2012, but their average, non-premium ticket is still the highest in the NFL at $117.94. The New England Patriots are second at $117.84 followed by the New York Giants at $111.69, Dallas Cowboys at $110.20 and Chicago Bears at $110.91.

Among AFC West teams, the Denver Broncos have an average ticket price of $82.23 followed by the San Diego Chargers at $80.30, the Kansas City Chiefs at $64.92 and the Raiders at $62.23.

The Cleveland Browns have the lowest average ticket price at $54.20. Rounding out the bottom five (from lowest to highest) are the Buffalo Bills at $58.36, Jacksonville Jaguars at $59.54, the Raiders at $62.23 and Carolina Panthers at $63.32.

The average Fan Cost Index, the cost for a family of four to attend a game, is $443.93, a 3.9 increase.

The Cowboys have the highest FCI at $634.78 and the Jaguars are the lowest at $342.70. The Raiders are 26th in FCI at $381.90 while the 49ers are ninth at $456.56.

To view the Team Marketing Report's 2012 NFL Fan Cost Index survey, please click Team Marketing Report

Updated: 09-09-2012

Raiders 30th in NFL Team Value
The Raiders rank 30th in 2012 NFL team valuations, according to Forbes.com. The team's worth rose 3 percent to 785 million from the previous year.

The average NFL team value increased to $1.11 billion, up 7 percent, from 2011.

The Dallas Cowboys are first at $2.1 billion followed by the New England Patriots at $1.635 billion. Rounding out the top five, the Washington Redskins are worth $1.6 billion, the New York Giants $1.468 billion and the Houston Texans $1.305 billion.

The Jacksonville Jaguars are 32nd at $770 million and the St. Louis Rams are 31st at $780 million. Please click for 2012 NFL team value rankings

Updated: 09-08-2012

Raiders 29th In Attendance
The Raiders ranked 29th in 2011 NFL attendance, according to espn.com. The team averaged 59,242 for its eight home games at O.co Coliseum.

For the first time since the Raiders returned to Oakland in 1995, the team had announced sellouts for all eight home games.

The Dallas Cowboys had the top attendance, averaging a whopping 85,512 at Cowboys Stadium. The New York Giants ranked second (79,475), followed by the New York Jets (78,986), Washington Redskins (76,921) and Denver Broncos (75,327). The bottom five teams were the Cincinatti Bengals (49,251), St. Louis Rams (56,394), Tampa Bay Buccaneers (56,614), Oakland (59,242) and Miami Dolphins (60,886).

The Raiders ranked 32nd in attendance in the 2009 and 2010 seasons.

Since the team returned to Oakland in 1995, 83 of 136 regular-season home games have been blacked out on local television because the games did not sell out in time. The football capacity for the Coliseum is 63,026.

Please click for 2011 NFL attendance rankings:

Updated: 01-12-2012

Raiders 32nd In Attendance
The Raiders ranked dead last out of 32 teams in NFL home attendance for the 2010 season, according to Sports Business Daily.com.

Oakland averaged 46,431 fans for its eight home games at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers (49,314) were the only other team to average under 50,000 fans.

The Dallas Cowboys had the top attendance, averaging a whopping 87,047 fans at the new Cowboys Stadium. The Washington Redskins ranked second (83,172) followed by the New York Giants (79,019), New York Jets (78,596) and the Denver Broncos (74,098).

The bottom five were Oakland, Tampa Bay, the St. Louis Rams (52,922), the Detroit Lions (56,285) and Minnesota (58,751).

According to SportsBusiness Daily.com, the NFL averaged 66,960 fans per game for the 2010 season, down 0.8% from the 2009 season.

The Raiders have had only one home sellout each of the past two seasons. Since the team returned to Oakland in 1995, 83 of 128 regular-season home games have been blacked out on local television because the games did not sell out. The football capacity for the Coliseum is 63,026.

Please click for 2010 NFL attendance rankings:

Updated: 01-05-2011

Raiders 31st in NFL Team Value
The Raiders rank 31st in 2010 NFL team valuations, according to Forbes.com. The Raiders are worth $758 million, according to the website. The Dallas Cowboys are first at $1.8 billion followed by the Washington Redskins at $1.55 billion and New England Patriots at $1.37 billion. The Jacksonville Jaguars are 32nd at $725 million and the 49ers are 22nd at $925 million. The NFL team value average is $1.02 billion, according to Forbes.

Please click for 2010 NFL team value rankings

Updated: 09-01-2010

TV Blackout Streak Ends
The Raiders-Kansas City Chiefs game on Nov. 7, 2010 has sold out and will be televised locally, the Raiders announced Nov. 5.

The past 11 Raiders home game were blacked out in the Bay Area. The Raiders had not sold out a game since their 2009 season opener against San Diego

NFL games normally need to be sold out 72 hours before kickoff to avoid a local television blackout in a 75-mile radius. The Raiders were granted a 24-hour extension on Nov. 4.

Oakland reportedly is averaging 41,153 fans this season at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum. The football capacity for the Coliseum is 63,026.

The Raiders reportedly have had 80 of 125 regular-season home games blacked out since returning from Los Angeles for the 1995 season.

Updated: 11-05-2010

Raiders 28th in NFL Ticket Cost
The average ticket price for an NFL game in 2010 increased 4.5 percent to $76.475, according to Chicago-based Team Marketing Report.

The Raiders ranked 28th at $62.23 and the 49ers 14th at $76.39, according to Team Marketing Report's 2010 Fan Cost Index survey.

The Raiders were among 15 teams that kept prices the same or lowered them from the 2009 season, according to TMR.

The New York Jets and Giants had the highest increases after moving into the New Meadowlands Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. Jets non-premium tickets went up 31.8 percent to $114.64 on average, and the Giants rose 26 percent to $111.69. New Orleans raised its average 20.5 percent to $74.99 after winning the Super Bowl.

The New England Patriots didn't raise prices, but it still had the highest average cost at $117.84. The Dallas Cowboys are fourth at $110.20, also with no increase.

The Cleveland Browns have the lowest average ticket price at $54.51, a decrease of 0.3 percent.

To view the Team Marketing Report's 2010 NFL Fan Cost Index survey, please click Team Marketing Report

Updated: 09-17-2010

Raiders Hit Bottom in 2009
The Raiders ranked 32nd out of 32 teams in 2009 National Football League attendance, as compiled by ESPN.

The Raiders had an average attendance of 44,285 for their eight home games at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum. They ranked 31st in 2008 (57,850), 2007 (59,110) and 2006 (58,496).

The Oakland Coliseum has a football seating capacity of 63,132.

The Dallas Cowboys ranked first in 2009 NFL attendance at 89,756 followed by the Washington Redskins at 84,794 and New York Giants at 78,701.

The 2009 NFL average attendance of 67,509 sold tickets is slightly down from the 2008 regular-season attendance record of 68,304. 2008 reportedly was the sixth consecutive season the league broke the regular-season attendance record.

Updated: 08-17-2010

Fade To Black(outs)
The final seven 2009 Raiders home games weren't televised locally because the team failed to sell out in time.

Per NFL rule, games need to be sold out 72 hours before kickoff to avoid a blackout in a 75-mile radius. The Raiders only sold out their 2009 season opener against San Diego.

The Raiders reportedly sold out six of eight games each of the previous three seasons after taking over ticket sales from Alameda County. In their first 11 seasons after returning from Los Angeles, the team sold out only 25 of 88 regular-season games in time to avoid a blackout.

Updated: 08-15-2010

Raiders Near Bottom
The Raiders ranked 31st out of 32 teams in 2008 National Football League attendance, according to Sports Business Daily.com

The Raiders had an average attendance of 57,850 for eight home games at the Oakland Alameda County Coliseum. Six of eight home games were announced sellouts. The Coliseum has a football seating capacity of 63,132.

The Detroit Lions ranked last (32nd) in 2008, with an average attendance of 54,497.

The Raiders also ranked 31st in 2007, averaging 59,110 per game, and 2006, averaging 58,496 per game.

The Washington Redskins ranked first in 2008 NFL average attendance at 88,604 followed by the New York Giants at 79,069 and the New York Jets at 78,482.

The NFL announced an attendance drop in 2008 compared to the previous season. The league had an average attendance of 68,241 in the 2008 season compared to 68,702 in 2007.

Updated: 04-21-2009

Sellouts Increase
The Raiders had six announced sellouts during their eight-game 2007 home schedule at McAfee Coliseum. Since taking over its ticket operations after the 2005 season, the team has avoided the local television blackout in 12 of the past 16 games. The Raiders reportedly sold out only 25 of 88 games from 1995 to 2005. Under NFL rules, a game must be declared a sellout 72 hours before kickoff in order to be televised locally.

Updated: 2-6-2008

Attendance Improves
Despite a 2-14 record, the Raiders had the third largest increase in 2006 NFL regular-season ticket sales, according to Sports Business Daily.com

The Raiders' 11.8 percent increase in home attendance topped the American Football Conference and ranked third overall in the NFL behind the Arizona Cardinals (49.6 percent) and New Orleans Saints (31.9 percent).

Oakland's average attendance of 58,496 ranked 31st out of 32 teams. McAfee Coliseum, the home of the Raiders, has a seating capacity of 63,132 for football.

The Raiders' 2006 average attendance is third highest since the franchise returned to Oakland in 1995. The Raiders averaged 60,637 fans per game at the Coliseum for the 2002 season, when they advanced to Super Bowl XXXVII. They averaged 59,011 in 2001.

The Indianapolis Colts ranked last in 2006 NFL average attendance at 57,172. The Colts' ranking is deceiving because the team's home, the RCA Dome, has the smallest seating capacity (55,531) in the league. The Colts' tickets sales were 100.2 percent of the stadium's capacity.

The Washington Redskins ranked first in 2006 NFL average attendance at 87,631 followed by the New York Giants at 78,614 and Kansas City Chiefs at 77,909.

The NFL set a regular-season attendance record for the fourth straight year. The league average of 68,733 was an increase of 2.0 percent from the 2005 season, when the NFL average was 67,451.

The Raiders and Bills were the only teams to have home games to sell less than 75 capacity.

Season-Ticket Sales Increase
The Raiders have sold about 37,000 season tickets, up from 29,000 at a similar point last year, team CEO Amy Trask told reporters Sept. 6. Season-ticket sales have increased close to 30 percent in the team's first year of handling ticket operations.

The Raiders are controlling ticket sales for the first time since the team returned to Oakland from Los Angeles in 1995. The Alameda County-run Oakland Football Marketing Association sold Raiders tickets the previous 11 years.

This is the first year that fans don't have to purchase a Personal Seat License to have the right to buy a Raiders season ticket. PSLs ranged from $250 to 4,000 in 1995. The prorated cost in 2005 was $25 to $400.

The county and team mutually agreed to end the controversial PSL plan in November 2005.

Under the new ticket plan, 65 percent of Raiders tickets at the 63,132-seat McAfee Coliseum are less expensive than they were in 2005, the Raiders announced in February. Tickets costing more than in 2005 are for high-end seats.

About 90 percent of the team's season ticket holders in 2005 have renewed, Trask said.

The Raiders are hoping the new pricing will spur attendance, which has lagged since the team returned to Oakland in 1995. Over the past 11 seasons, 59 of 88 regular-season home games have been blacked out locally because McAfee Coliseum wasn't sold out 72 hours in advance, per NFL rule.

Updated: 9-7-2006

Raiders 15th in Ticket Price
The Raiders rank 15th in average ticket price for 2006 NFL games, according to the annual survey by Chicago-based Team Marketing Report. The Raiders' average ticket cost of $62.23 is slightly lower than the league average of $62.38.

The New England Patriots have the top average price of $90.89 and the Buffalo Bills are the lowest at $41.29.

The San Francisco 49ers rank 13th in average cost at $63.70.

Here's the top five average prices: New England ($90.89), Washington ($79.13), Chicago ($77.78), Giants ($76.59) and Jets ($74.96).

Here's the bottom five prices: Buffalo ($41.29), Jacksonville ($45.08), Tennessee ($47.82), Cleveland ($48.79) and Seattle ($50.46).

According to Team Marketing Report, 21 teams raised ticket prices, including the Washington Redskins at a league-high 17.2 percent. The San Diego Chargers' increase was 14.6 percent, the second straight year of double-digit increases by the AFC West team.

NFL ticket prices increased by an average of 5.6 percent, according to the survey.

Updated: 9-7-2006

Raiders 30th in Attendance
The Raiders ranked 30th out of 32 teams in 2005 National Football League attendance. The AFC West team averaged 52,306 fans for its eight regular-season home games at McAfee Coliseum) in Oakland. The Raiders averaged 50,742 (31th in the league) in 2004. The Coliseum seating capacity for football is listed at 63,132.

The NFL average attendance for the 2005 season was a record 66,455 (breaking the mark of 66,409 in 2004), according to nfl.com. The league doesn't release attendance figures for its 32 teams.

According to kenn.com, the Washington Redskins led the league in 2005 average attendance at 89,625 followed by the New York Giants at 78,565, Kansas City Chiefs at 77,9166 New York Jets at 77,495 and Denver Broncos.

The Raiders finished ahead of only the New Orleans Saints at 52,159 and Arizona Cardinals at 50,129.

Updated: 9-7-2006

2005 Attendance Increases
The Raiders averaged 52,306 (30th in the league) fans for their eight-game, 2005 home schedule at McAfee Coliseum in Oakland. The league average was 66,455. The Raiders' home attendance increased an average of 1,564 fans from the 2004 season.

Only three of Oakland's 2005 eight regular-season home games (Kansas City, Dallas and Denver) were announced sellouts). Since 1995 when the franchise returned to Oakland from Los Angeles, 59 of the Raiders' 88 regular-season home games have been blacked out in the Bay Area.

The Raiders averaged 50,742 fans (31st in the league) in the 2004 season. They averaged 55,008 (30th) in 2003. The Coliseum seating capacity for football is listed at 62,500.

Updated: 1-22-2006

Raiders Scrap PSLs
The Raiders and the city of Oakland and Alameda County officials have agreed to end the Personal Seat License concept. More

Fade To Blackout
Since the Raiders returned to Oakland in 1995, 53 of their 80 regular-season home games have been blacked out in the Bay Area, according to a published report in the San Francisco Chronicle on Aug. 21, 2005. An NFL game is blacked out unless it is sold out 72 hours before kickoff. The Chronicle also reported that the Raiders have approximately 29,000 season tickets for the 2005 season, and only 12,000 current Personal Seat License holders.

The PSL plan, which began in Oakland in 1995, allowed PSL holders the right to buy Raiders season tickets through the 2005 season. In 1995, the cost of a PSL ranged from $250 to $4,000. For the 2005 season, the cost of a 10-game season ticket ranges from $470 to $910. There's also an annual maintenance fee of $70 per ticket.

Under the original PSL agreement, PSLs are scheduled to be re-sold at 75 percent of their original cost over the final five seasons (2006-2010) of the team's lease in Oakland. Alameda County and the team reportedly have been trying to come up with a marketing plan to avoid heavy cancellations, which are expected under the 75 percent renewal plan.

The Raiders ranked 31st out of 32 teams in 2004 National Football League attendance. The AFC West team averaged 50,742 fans for its eight regular-season home games at Network Associates Coliseum (since renamed McAfee Coliseum). The Raiders averaged 55,008 (30th in the league) in 2003. The Coliseum seating capacity for football is listed at 62,500.

Contributing: S.F. Chronicle

Updated: 8-28-2005

Raiders 31st in Attendance
The Raiders ranked 31st out of 32 teams in 2004 National Football League attendance. The AFC West team averaged 50,742 fans for its eight regular-season home games at Network Associates Coliseum (since renamed McAfee Coliseum) in Oakland. The Raiders averaged 55,008 (30th in the league) in 2003. The Coliseum seating capacity for football is listed at 62,500.

The NFL average attendance for the 2004 season was a record 66,409 (breaking the mark of 66,328 in 2003), according to nfl.com. The league doesn't release attendance figures for its 32 teams.

According to kenn.com, the Washington Redskins led the league in 2004 average attendance at 87,833 followed by the New York Giants at 78,734, Kansas City Chiefs at 77,876 New York Jets at 77,897 and Cleveland Browns at 73,105. The 49ers ranked 22nd at 64,783.

The Raiders finished ahead of only the Arizona Cardinals, who averaged a league-worst 35,753 fans.

Updated: 2-26-2005

Raiders 12th in Ticket Cost
The average ticket price for an NFL game in 2004 is $54.75, an increase of 4.9 percent from 2003. According to Chicago-based Team Marketing Report's annual survey, the Raiders rank 12th at $58.89. For Raiders tickets in Oakland, the average cost doesn't factor in Personal Seat License fees for season ticket holders and preminum location fees ($10 to $20) for single-game tickets.

The New England Patriots have the league's most expensive average ticket cost at $75.53 followed by the Washington Redskins ($68.12), Kansas City Chiefs ($67.26), New York Giants ($66.67) and New York Jets ($66.39). For you devout wine sippers and quiche eaters, the 49ers are seventh at $64.00. The Buffalo Bills have the lowest average ticket price at $37.13.

Updated: 9-10-2004

Ticket Ripoff - Again
In a continuing effort to discourage ticket buying to Raiders home games, the Oakland Football Marketing Association - which sets policy for Raiders tickets sales - announced July 13 that Personal Seat License holders and season-ticket holders must purchase a three-game miniplan to buy additional seats for the Sept. 26 home game against Tampa Bay, led by former Raiders coach Jon Gruden.

According to an OFMA news release, Tampa Bay tickets are only available if a PSL holder purchases the same number of tickets to the home opener against Buffalo on Sept. 19 and another game of choice (excluding Denver and Kansas City). In other words, if you're a Raiders season-ticket holder and you want to buy an additional two Bucs game tickets, it's going to cost you a mininum of $282 - two tickets per game priced at $47.00, which puts you in the end zone on Mount Davis. If you want first-level end zone seats (priced at $67.00 each), the cost is $402. If you want two seats to watch the Bucs play the Raiders in a rematch of Super Bowl XXXVII, you're better off going through a ticket broker - you should be able to get a couple of nosebleed seats for $400.

In fairness to the OFMA, the public agency announced Sept. 15 that PSL holders could purchase tickets to the Tampa Bay game without having to buy an additional two games. Tickets were scheduled to become available to the general public Sept. 17.

In 2002, the OFMA offered a similar extortion ticket plan for the Raiders' eagerly awaited home game against the 49ers. Non-PSL holders initially had to purchase an additional three games to have the right to get tickets to the 49ers' game. Eventually, that four-game plan was dropped. PSL holders were allowed to purchase additional seats to the 49ers game without paying for other games.

Updated: 9-15-2004

Raiders 30th in 2003 NFL Attendance
The Raiders ranked 30th out of 32 teams in 2003 National Football League attendance. The AFC West team averaged 55,008 fans for its eight regular-season home games at Network Associates Coliseum in Oakland.

The NFL average attendance for the 2003 season was a record 66,328 (breaking the mark of 66,078 in 2000), according to the league. The NFL doesn't release attendance figures for its 32 teams.

According to kenn.com, the Washington Redskins led the league in 2003 average attendance at 80,500 followed by the New York Giants at 78,620, Kansas City Chiefs at 78,480 New York Jets at 77,782 and Denver Broncos at 75,896. The 49ers ranked 18 at 67,581.

The Raiders finished ahead of only the Jacksonville Jaguars (53,509) and Arizona Cardinals (36,062).

NFL attendance figures courtesy of kenn.com

Updated: 2-26-2005

The Price You Pay
The average ticket price for an NFL game in 2003 is $52.95, an increase of 6 percent from the previous season. According to Team Marketing Report's annual survey, the Raiders ranked ninth at $58.89 - although that price doesn't factor in Personal Seat License fees for season-ticket holders and preminum location fees ($10 to $20) for single-game tickets.

The New England Patriots have the NFL's most expensive average ticket cost at $73.33 followed by the Washington Redskins ($68.06), the Philadelphia Eagles ($64.00), the Chicago Bears ($65.00) and the Jacksonville Jaguars ($62.85). The Eagles jumped a league-high 38.6 percent in ticket cost by moving from Veterans Stadium to plush Lincoln Financial Field.

The Bottom 5 ticket cost is the Atlanta Falcons ($34.63), the Arizona Cardinals, ($35.99), the Buffalo Bills ($42.55), the Seattle Seahawks ($43.06) and the Tennessee Titans ($43.35).

For you devout wine sippers and quiche eaters, the 49ers ranked 11th in average ticket cost at $58.00.

Updated: 9-10-2003

Food Ban Lifted
At the request of the Raiders, Network Associates Coliseum has reversed its ban prohibiting fans from bringing food into the stadium for the 2003 season, the team announced July 30. Under the revised policy, beverages still won't be allowed into the Coliseum.

Outside food will be permitted if it is packaged in see-through containers, according to published reports. Fans will be asked to enter through specifics gates in order for the food to be inspected.

When Raiders season-ticket holders received their 2003 tickets in the mail in mid-July, a letter from the Oakland Football Marketing Association announced two new banned items at the Coliseum - food and beverage. Since the Raiders returned to Oakland in 1995, fans had been permitted to bring in food and non-alcoholic beverages in plastic containers into the Coliseum.

Fourteen NFL teams ban outside food, according to The Associated Press.

Updated: 8-1-2003
Fan Dis-Service
The Oakland Football Marketing Association, which handles Raiders season tickets, has added another black eye to its already soiled reputation.

Some Raiders' season-ticket holders and media criticized the OFMA for its method of dispersing 5,000 tickets to Super Bowl XXXVII between Oakland and Tampa Bay in San Diego on Jan. 26, 2003. In the days leading up to the Raiders' first Super Bowl appearance since 1984, OFMA representatives reportedly contacted ticket winners from a random lottery of approximately 29,500 Personal Seat License holders by telephone. Fans must purchase a PSL for the right to buy a Raiders' season ticket.

Some potential lottery winners could have been deprived of a chance to purchase the pricey Super Bowl tickets (which carried a face value of $500 & $400) because they weren't near their telephone when the OFMA called. If a person didn't answer the telephone, the OFMA wouldn't leave a message. Also, some fans weren't informed they were lottery winners until Thursday night - less than 72 hours before kickoff at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego.

Initially, the Raiders allocated only 2,000 Super Bowl tickets to season-ticket holders from the team's reported allotment of 11,550. The Raiders released an additional 500 tickets each on Tuesday (Jan. 21) and Wednesday (Jan. 22) and then 2,000 on Thursday (Jan. 23). The final batch of tickets Thursday reportedly became available after the Raiders failed to strike deals with corporate sponsors. The team also made 3,000 tickets available to its luxury suite holders.

The OFMA didn't conduct a Super Bowl ticket lottery until Jan. 17 - two days before the Raiders beat the Tennessee Titans in the AFC title game. Both the Titans and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, who beat the Philadelphia Eagles in the NFC title game, reportedly informed their season-ticket holders by letter if they were Super Bowl ticket lottery winners during the week of the conference championship games.

Updated: 1-29-2003

Fans Flock To The NET
For the first time since returning to Oakland in 1995, the Raiders averaged over 60,000 in attendance for their eight-game 2002 regular-season schedule at Network Associates Coliseum. The team had an announced home attendance of 485,092 (60,637 per game). Attendance for Raiders' games in Oakland improved for the fourth straight season. The Raiders sold out their last five 2002 regular-season home games prior to the league-mandated 72-hour deadline to beat the television blackout. The only three non-sellouts were Seattle (53,260), Tennessee (58,719) and San Diego (60,974). The Raiders-49ers game on Nov. 3 drew a Coliseum-record crowd of 62,660. The Raiders averaged 59,011 for their eight home games in 2001. The Coliseum seating capacity is listed at 62,500 for football.

Updated: 1-2-2003

Just Pay, Baby!
The Raiders increased ticket prices 16 percent for the 2002 season, the team announced March 22, 2002. Tickets in the three categories jumped from $40 to $46, $50 to $58 and $60 to $70. On March 21, the eight-member Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum Authority voted to increase the annual Personal Seat License maintenance fee from $60 to $70. The Raiders and NFL share ticket revenue, but the city and county receive PSL revenue. The price increase for tickets is the first since the Raiders returned to Oakland from Los Angeles in 1995.

Updated: 3-24-2002

Raiders 24th in 2001 NFL Attendance
The Raiders ranked 24th out of 31 teams in 2001 NFL attendance, according to figures in the NFL 2002 Record & Fact Book. The team averaged 59,011 fans for its eight regular-season home games at Network Associates Coliseum. It's the third straight year the average attendance has increased in Oakland. The Raiders averaged 57,814 fans in 2000. The Raiders-Denver Broncos game drew a Coliseum-record crowd of 62,637 fans on Nov. 5, 2001. The average NFL attendance in 2001 was 65,187. The Washington Redskins led with an average of 82,746, while the Arizona Cardinals were last at 38,414.

Updated: 9-9-2002

2000 Attendance Improves
The Raiders finished 26th out of 31 teams in NFL attendance for the 2000 regular season, according to figures from the Sports Business Daily. The results were made public on Jan 4, 2001. The team averaged 57,814 fans - an improvement of 16.2 percent from 1999, when the average was 49,768 fans at Network Associates Coliseum. The year-to-year improvement was tops in the AFC and third best in the NFL. The Raiders sold out three regular-season games (Denver on Sept. 17, Kansas City on Nov. 5 and the New York Jets on Dec. 10) prior to the league-mandated 72-hour deadline to beat the television blackout. The Coliseum capacity is listed at 60,750, not including luxury boxes. The average attendance for NFL games during the 2000 regular season was a record 66,078 fans.

Fade To Black(out)
The Raiders ended a dubious streak of 24 straight non-sellouts on Sept. 17, 2000 when an announced crowd of 62,078 fans watched the Raiders suffer a 33-24 loss to Denver at Network Associates Coliseum. The previous Raiders' home sellout was on Sept. 8, 1997 when a crowd of 61,523 fans watched Oakland lose to Kansas City 28-27.

Turnstile Count
Attendance at Raiders home games increased three percent for the 1999-2000 season. The team announced an average crowd of 49,768 for its eight regular-season games at Network Associates Coliseum. The average attendance was 48,319 in 1998 and 46,938 in 1997. The Raiders averaged 53,127 in 1996 when the Coliseum capacity was increased from 54,444 to 62,500. The average was 52,922 in 1995.

Near The Bottom
The Raiders were 29th in NFL home attendance for the 1999-2000 season with an average crowd of 49,768. Oakland ranked ahead of only the Arizona Cardinals (49,155) and the New Orleans Saints (45,166). The Kansas City Chiefs led the NFL with an average attendance of 78,693. The league average attendance was 65,349.

OAKLAND RAIDERS RAP

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